Domestic Violence

Are you being hurt or controlled? Do you know someone who is? Domestic violence is abuse by a current or former, spouse or a boyfriend or girlfriend, in order to maintain power and control over the other person. The abuse can take many forms including verbal, emotional, psychological, physical, sexual, and economic. Domestic violence can happen to anyone.

ABUSE IS:

  • Learned behavior
  • Often repeated and escalating
  • Coercive and targeted
  • Present in all ages, races, ethnicities, cultures, sexual orientations, religions, economic and education level
  • Carried out in an environment of fear and intimidation
Many victims are taken by surprise the first time their partner hits them. Does your partner or ex-partner:

  • Regularly criticize you, call you names or minimize your feelings?
  • Make you feel afraid or unsafe?
  • Hit, punch, slap, kick, shove, strangle or bite you?
  • Destroy or steal your belongings?
  • Abuse, threaten, intimidate, or manipulate your children?
  • Isolate you from family, friends or community?
  • Threaten to “out” you or criticize your sexuality?
  • Threaten to hurt your friends, family or pets?
  • Threaten to deport you or not submit immigration papers for you?
  • Control your access to money or a car?
  • Prevent you from going where you want when you want?
  • Deny you food, clothing, sleep or medications?
  • Have affairs, accuse you of having affairs, or force you to have sex against your will? Use weapons or objects to hurt or threaten you?


  • Talk to office or building security and provide a picture of the defendant, if you have one.
  • Screen your calls both at home, on your cell and at work.
  • If you are in school, inform your adviser and the security office. Have someone escort you to your car.
  • Use a variety of routes to go home if possible. Devise a plan should something happen while going home. Devise a plan should something happen when you are out in public. Check for exit routes in public places. Identify safe places you can go in an emergency
  • Choose a code word to use with your co-workers, significant other, children, family, friends, and neighbors when you need the police.


  • To leave an abusive relationship safely, advance planning is essential. If an argument seems unavoidable, have access to an exit
  • Know how to get out of your home safely Identify one or more neighbors that you can tell about the violence, and ask that they call 911 if they hear a disturbance coming from your home
  • Choose a code word to use with your children, family, friends, and neighbors when you need the police
  • Plan where you will go if you have to leave (even if you don’t think you will ever need to) Identify safe places you can go in an emergency
  • Have a packed bag ready and keep it at a relative’s or a friend’s home in case you need to leave quickly


YES.
If you are being threatened or hurt call 9-1-1. If you fear for your safety, ask the dispatcher to stay on the line until police arrive.
Remember : If you are in danger, call 9-1-1

Have access to the following:

  • Identification such as a driver’s license, social security card, green card, or passport
  • Important papers such as birth certificates, insurance information, school and health records, welfare and immigration documents, and divorce or other court documents
  • Money, credit cards, bank account number, and ATM cards
  • Copies of your protection order
  • Keys (for home, car, and office)
  • Medications and prescriptions
  • Phone numbers and addresses Clothing and comfort items for you and your children
  • Jewelry and other valuables A savings account in your own name
  • A shelter phone number


If you know or suspect that someone is being abused, there are ways you can help:

  • Do not blame the victim
  • Allow the victim to make her own decisions
  • Review a safety plan with the victim
  • Offer to receive mail for the victim, or drive her to the police station, doctor’s office or court
  • Stay in contact, even if the abuser makes it difficult
  • Educate yourself further about domestic violence. The Colorado Coalition Against Domestic Violence offers many resources for education and support for significant others at www.ccadv.org
  • Be a good listener: Talk about what will work for the victim, NOT what you think you would do in the same situation


A civil protection order, commonly referred to as a restraining order, may be requested from the court in a separate civil action. Employees of the District Attorney’s Office, including the deputy district attorney assigned to the criminal case and the advocate, are restricted from representing or assisting you in civil court proceedings. Anyone may request a civil protection order, whether or not they have contacted the police. A filing packet may be obtained from the court or by contacting a domestic violence agency for assistance in filing for an order. A mandatory criminal protection order is automatically entered in all criminal domestic violence cases.

There are several non-profit agencies that can provide you with the appropriate information and help. These agencies work in an office location at both the Adams and Broomfield County Justice Centers. Hours of operation vary, so it may be helpful to call ahead to make sure that someone will be in the office to meet with you and answer your questions.

ADAMS COUNTY CIVIL PROTECTION ORDER ASSISTANCE
(303)673-7761 Project Safeguard

BROOMFIELD COUNTY CIVIL PROTECTION ORDER ASSISTANCE
(720)887-2179 Project Safeguard and
Safehouse Progressive Alliance for Non-Violence (SPAN)

For information on filing for a civil protection order CLICK HERE for instructions from the Colorado Courts
CLICK HERE
Protection order Sample


Talk to office or building security and provide a picture of the defendant, if you have one.
Screen your calls both at home, on your cell and at work.
If you are in school, inform your adviser and the security office of your involvement as a witness in a criminal court case.

  • Have someone escort you to your car.
  • Use a variety of routes to go home if possible.
  • Devise a plan should something happen while going home.
  • Devise a plan should something happen when you are home and for when you are out in public.
  • Know how to get out of your home safely.
  • Check for exit routes in public places.
  • Identify safe places you can go in an emergency.
  • Choose a code word to use with your co-workers, significant other, children, family, friends, and neighbors when you need the police.


If you know or suspect that someone has been sexually assaulted, there are ways you can help:

  • Do not blame the victim.
  • Allow the victim to make her own decisions.
  • Review a safety plan with the victim.
  • Offer to receive mail for the victim, run errands, or drive her to the police station, doctor’s office therapy sessions or court Stay in contact.
  • Educate yourself further about sexual assault. The Colorado Coalition Against Sexual Assault offers many resources for education and support for significant others at www.ccasa.org
  • Be a good listener: Talk about what will work for the victim, NOT what you think you would do in the same situation

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